Lady Science no. 33: Fascism, Gender, and Science: Part II

The Science of Life as Art and Dissent by Christopher Martiniano 

Eugenics: Policing Everything by Joy L. Rankin 

In Part II of Fascism, Gender, and Science, guest writer Christoper Martiniano writes about William Blake's radical art of science, which challenged the authoritarian government of 1790s London. Contributing Editor Joy Rankin looks at the history of American eugenics and how science was deployed for anti-democratic and authoritarian ends. 


Lady Science no. 32: Fascism, Gender, and Science: Part 1

Feminism, Fascism, and Frogs: The Case of Bertha Lutz at the United Nations by Cassia Roth

Seducing the 'Feeble-minded' by Adam R. Shapiro

In the first installment of our series on Fascism, Gender, and Science, Cassia Roth explores the scientific career of outspoken feminist Bertha Lutz under Getulio Vargas's fascist regime in Brazil. Adam Shapiro looks at the history of eugenics and erasure in American textbooks. 

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Lady Science no. 31: Witches and Wives

The Personal in the Professional: a 19th-Century Hangover by Amanda Barnett

Forced into the Fringe: Margaret Murray’s Witch-Cult Hypothesis by Kathleen Sheppard

For this issue, Contributing Editor Kathleen Sheppard writes about Margaret Murray, not as Egyptologist or archaeologist, but as a folklorist who wrote the first definitive study of witches. Guest writer Amanda Barnett explores the differences of writing about male and female scientists' personal and professional lives.


Lady Science no. 30: Data and Domesticity

The History of Data is the History of Labor: Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Creation of a "truth truer than a poem" by Deanna Day

Mary Somerville, A Domestic Icon of Science by Michal Meyer

For Women's History Month, we have teamed up with writers from Chemical Heritage Foundation, Deanna Day and Michal Meyer. Day writes about the history of women's labor with Mary Putnam Jacobi's work on menstruation. Meyer explores how Mary Somerville navigated the strict gender roles of the 19th century while pursuing recognition for her work in science. 

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Lady Science no. 29: Naughty Nurses & Nightingale Myths

Why Are We Still Talking About the "Naughty Nurse"? by Jenna Tonn 

Florence Nightingale: Of Myths and Maths by Joy L. Rankin 

In this issue, guest writer Jenna Tonn traces the history of the "naught nurse" trope. Contributing Editor Joy Rankin tells the little known story of Florence Nightingale as statistician, not nurse. 

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